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The Clay County Advocate - Press-Flora, IL
  • Depot show is a holiday blast

  • In 1941, it was Bing Crosby who set out to only work on holidays in the classic movie ‘Holiday Inn.’ Seventy years later Flora’s finest took to the stage in an homage to the various holidays in the 2011 Depot Variety Show, ‘Stocking Stuffers.’While holidays are a joyful time, t...
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  • In 1941, it was Bing Crosby who set out to only work on holidays in the classic movie ‘Holiday Inn.’ Seventy years later Flora’s finest took to the stage in an homage to the various holidays in the 2011 Depot Variety Show, ‘Stocking Stuffers.’
    While holidays are a joyful time, this year’s Depot Show started off on a somber note as the Depot Players remembered last year’s leader, Bill Oliver, who passed away suddenly last fall.
    “For a while we thought we were lost,” said Jack Thatcher of the loss of Oliver who had directed last years show and was going to write this year’s.
    The cast included a long list of local favorites playing well known characters from the major holidays.
    Those that appeared in order were; Lizabeth Engelmeier as the Easter Bunny, Dr. Don Bunnell, as Uncle Sam, Becky Wiley as Hagatha The Witch, Jim Earleywine as Cupid, Rob Clifton as Ezekiel the Pilgrim, Jarrod Kohn, David Billingsly and Doug Mack as elves, Angi Freeman as a female elf, Bill Atwood as Donner, Jay Keele as Blitzen, Robin Atwood, Promise McGrew, Joy Gorrell and Stacey Earleywine as Dolls, Berdella McGrew, as Barbie, Pat Garrett as G.I. Joe, Kris Engelmeier as Ebenezer Scrooge, Beth Cooper as Grandma, Ben VanHyning as a judge, Conner Earleywine as a bailiff, Doug Mack as Egg Nog, and Bethany Kuhlig as a medicine bottle.
    The entire cast joined together at the end of the play to sing ‘Holiday Inn.’
    The play was comprised of six holiday scenes.
    All of the characters that you love and enjoy are here, starting with the first scene where Uncle Sam, Easter Bunny, Cupid, Ezekiel the Pilgrim, and Hagatha the Witch are envious of the popularity of Santa Claus, only to be won over by a twist of fate.
    The second scene depicts Donner and Blitzen, who have been exercising during the off-season because they are tired of bringing up the rear of the pack, all because of a song.
    The third scene depicts Talking Cathy, with four talking dolls ordained to speak “insignificant - one dimensional” phrases. While three are content with their lives, one realizes that they can make a difference in the world, if only they decided to speak out.
    In the fourth scene we watch two elves on break, as they learn that Santa has decided to hire females in the shop - their transition is revealing.
    In the fifth scene we join Barbie and G. I. Joe, as they discuss Barbie’s potential break-up with Ken in this love triangle that pits rough and tough against tender and sensitive.
    And the sixth scene culminates in a trial of the reindeer that ran over Grandma with the entrance of Scrooge as the prosecuting attorney.
    Page 2 of 2 - Behind the scenes were numerous people that made the performances possible. They included Director Mary Kenley, backstage supervisor Linda Manring, production director Terry Igert, curtain Connor Earleywine, sound Jim Earleywine and Jonathan Garrett, light board Jacob Perry, spot light Rick Gibbs, power points Evan Thackrey, videography Rod Engelmeier and Rob West, program advertising Jack and Bonnie Thatcher, program design Hometown Journal, program printing Clay County Republican, ticket sales Karen Halsey, Ron and Barbara Parks, Pauline Frost, Ina Ray, Alice Casolari, Janice Hagen, Vicki Campbell, Chris Williams, finance FCDC Depot Renovation Board, make up Lucille Anderson, Jodi Windle and Sonja Garrett, ushers Lindy and Roberta Hosselton, Edwin Jones, Kenny Myers and Don Thomas, DVD sales Naomi Nakajima and Nancy Luzadder.
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